October 2011


“I think it’s dangerous to make blanket statements about the effect of a medium on people when we all have different sensibilities on these things,” Jay told Gamasutra. “It depends on the level of literacy of the person playing the game. For some people they’re going to be distracted by it and bothered by it, and other people are going to report that it’s really not that notable. Perceptions are going to be variable.”

While some curse words, especially the “explicit” ones dealing with sexual and excretory function [i.e. "fuck" and "shit" -- ed.], have maintained their strong offensive power pretty consistently for hundreds of years, others like “hell” or “goddamn” have gradually lost much of their effect over the years through frequent, everyday use. Jay said he thinks the same process may be happening with the word “bitch” as it has increasingly entered mainstream use through hip hop and rap culture over the past few decades.

(full article)


Since Microsoft first announced vague plans to add live TV optionsto its Xbox Live service at E3 this year, industry watchers have been heralding the move as a potential death-blow for standalone cable boxes, and even for separate pay TV service itself.

Those cries have only increased with Microsoft’s announcement today of dozens of major partnerships with various media companies to bring video content to Microsoft’s online service.

Microsoft itself is selling it as “the best way for you to interact with TV, video, movies, sports and music” and “a WHOLE LOT more enjoyable and engaging” than current TV options.

As announced today, though, Microsoft’s Xbox Live TV plans seem like a squandered opportunity to extend the company’s strong position in online gaming into a foothold in the burgeoning IPTV market.

(full article)