Mark Cerny’s nearly 30-year career in video games has covered everything from Marble Madness and Crash Bandicoot to Killzone 2and God of War III. But one of the biggest changes Cerny has seen in all that time hasn’t been in the games themselves, but in the size of the teams making them.

In an interview with Gamasutra earlier this year, Cerny recalled that the arcade games he was designing almost entirely on his own had to live and die 25 cents a go, without help from today’s huge marketing budgets or press coverage, which didn’t exist at the time.

“Consequently that meant you made a game and you were 100 percent responsible for its success,” he recalled. “You couldn’t blame upper management who didn’t understand you, you couldn’t blame the marketing guys who didn’t put together the proper marketing campaign; you put your game directly in front of the consumers at a play test and if it earned enough money that game would sell and if it didn’t earn enough money that game wouldn’t.”

Now, that kind of direct connection with consumers is blocked by layers of marketing, and also by a whole team of people working on the game. Cerny said the increasing size of these teams has made it increasingly difficult for him to make his mark on a project.

(full article)