January 2010


This week famed game journalist Kyle Orland joins Lara, Julian and Cory to discuss the dissolving of Crispy Gamer, the state of freelance journalism and more!

(Download MP3 — 47MB, 1:22:11)
(More info on GamersWithJobs.com)


As I write this, all the letters I type are slowly falling down and drifting ever so gently to the left in my mind. And I keep imagining a little figure in overalls, about two letters high and one letter wide, jumping on top of those letters as they appear, or bashing them from below to unlock valuable coins inside.

The reason for these odd hallucinations is Tuper Tario Tros., a Flash-based combination of two of the most addictive games in history — Tetris and Super Mario Bros. — into a game that … well, it isn’t quite as addictive as both games combined, but is awfully close.

(full article)


In this issue:

  • Do We Need Physical Conferences in a Digital World?
  • How the Spike TV Video Game Awards Are Hurting the Game Industry
  • News Bytes
  • Quote of the Moment
  • change

(full article)


Highlighting only the useful products shown at the Consumer Electronics Show misses half the point of one of the largest trade shows in the world. The real attractions of CES are the odd, one-off products, the over-the-top booths and the sheer weirdness on display everywhere you turn. And so, the CES Special Awards Division makes its triumphant return this year to capture a small portion of that weirdness for those of you that didn’t risk getting crushed by 10,000 people trying to get the same cab outside the Las Vegas Hilton. Enjoy!

(full article)


Since the Electronic Entertainment Expo split off from the Consumer Electronics Show in 1995, CES hasn’t exactly been the primary showcase for videogame publishers and developers. But while the software makers may have moved to a different show, many gaming hardware makers have stuck with CES, showing off their new wares in Vegas each year. Here are the most noteworthy of the selection shown at the show this year.

(full article)


With the coming of 2010 and the leaving of the Noughties, there are a lot of ways you could go about determining the “Game of the Decade.” You can just pick your own favorites, of course, but that’s always going to come off as overly subjective and personal. You can choose some nominees and ask the public to weigh in, as we did with our epic Game of the Decade bracket, but that really just tells you what’s popular with a certain subset of readers of one site. You can look at review or sales numbers, but those just tell you how well a game was received at the time of its release (by critics and the public, respectively).

What I wanted was a definitive Game of the Decade list — a collection of choices that represented a wide range of professional, knowledgeable opinions about the last 10 years of games. I figured such a list wouldn’t just pop into existence on its own, so I decided to build it myself.

(full article)