August 2008


August is usually a slow month in the gaming press, with journalists easing down from E3 and gearing up for the impending holiday season. That hasn’t seemed true this year, with Leipzig’s Games Convention, a slew of high-profile Xbox Live Arcade titles and the upcoming Penny Arcade Expo keeping gaming newsrooms humming. The introspective month of August has also been a busy time for game journalists talking about game journalism itself. Some highlights and commentary from around the Web:

  • Why game critics aren’t elitist snobs (and why this is a bad thing)
  • Behind the Scenes at EGM and 1UP
  • New guitar gaming mag shows signs of life in the print industry
  • Movers and Shakers: Geoff Keighley promoted

(full article)


A little over 20 years ago, Nintendo sent a free, glossy, full-color, magazine-sized Nintendo advertisement to the 3.6 million members of its Nintendo Fun Club. In the years that followed, legions of Nintendo fans made Nintendo Power one of the most popular magazines in the United States, despite the fact that its content resembled propaganda more than journalism. The magazine’s popularity has fallen off somewhat since those heady days, but the content has become much more respectable under the new management of Future Publishing and veteran game journalist Chris Slate. I talked with Slate about the magazine’s history, its current challenges and its future.

(full article)


Say the word “hacking” and it conjures up images of soldering irons, complicated computer configurations and Keanu Reeves from The Matrix. Fortunately, you don’t need any of those things to run cool homebrew software that will play old-school games or MP3s on your Wii.

Armed with an SD card, a computer with an SD card slot (or adapter), a copy of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, it’s just a matter of following these four simple steps to turn your plain old Wii system into something more Wii-tastic.

(full article)