February 2006


The recent riots that have plagued Western embassies across the Middle East have been rated "E" for "Cartoon Violence" by the Arabian Software Ratings Board.

The ASRB said that the riots, sparked by months-old Danish cartoons depicting the prophet Muhammad, are appropriate for all ages and provide good fun in a social setting.

(full article)


The Association of Bakers, Confectioners and Dessert-makers (ABCD) today issued a formal letter to Nintendo Co. Ltd. protesting demeaning portrayal of bakers in the game Yoshi’s Cookie.

The letter says that the game gives children an unrealistic perception of what a baker’s job is really like.

(full article)


Wait long enough, and everything comes back in style. It’s true in fashion. It’s true in videogames. So, why shouldn’t it be true in videogame-based fashion?

Gamers everywhere are appreciating the games of yesteryear through compilation discs, legal and illegal emulator downloads, and even upright cabinets at the local mega-arcade/drinking establishment. The trend has been echoed in an explosion of apparel, mainly T-shirts, featuring designs inspired by or ripped straight from the most popular games of years past.

Now, for the first time since elementary school, you can proudly wear Mario on your shirt again. Except this time, Mario is offering "mustache rides." Or offering to clean your pipes. Or offering not so subtle drug references on your boxers.

Back then, Mario was your digital best friend. Today, Mario is your homeboy.

(full article)


Wait long enough, and everything comes back in style. It’s true in fashion. It’s true in videogames. So, why shouldn’t it be true in videogame-based fashion?

Gamers everywhere are appreciating the games of yesteryear through compilation discs, legal and illegal emulator downloads, and even upright cabinets at the local mega-arcade/drinking establishment. The trend has been echoed in an explosion of apparel, mainly T-shirts, featuring designs inspired by or ripped straight from the most popular games of years past.

Now, for the first time since elementary school, you can proudly wear Mario on your shirt again. Except this time, Mario is offering "mustache rides." Or offering to clean your pipes. Or offering not so subtle drug references on your boxers.

Back then, Mario was your digital best friend. Today, Mario is your homeboy.

(full article)


Kyle Orland moderated a spirited panel on Games Journalism with Vic Lucas of G4TV’s Electric Playground, Sam Kennedy of 1up.com, Julianne Greer of The Escapist, Matt Williamson of The Gamer’s Quarter, and Dan Morris of PC Gamer.

(part 1)


A lot is made these days about the new social revolution in videogames. The conventional wisdom goes something like this: Games used to mainly be a solitary experience for socially reclusive, nerdy kids who preferred sitting in a dark basement to interacting with the outside world, but today’s online first-person shooters and massively multiplayer RPGs allow gamers to come out of the basement and forge relationships in the warm cathode light of LAN parties and dungeon raids.

Anyone who actually grew up with games knows this is a bunch of hooey. Social interaction has always been a part of gaming. From drunken frat boys betting on Pong tournaments to school kids fighting side by side as Ninja Turtles to crowds of eager teens placing their coins on a weathered Street Fighter 2 cabinet, the socializing influence of multiplayer games predates recent telecommunications advances by decades.

But discussions of the deep, personal connections that can be made through multiplayer gaming usually gloss over the deep, personal connections that

can also be made through single player gaming. In fact, one single player game in particular helped me connect to two of the most important people in my life – and I didn’t even realize it until I played Super Mario 64 DS.

(full article)


Mario has been billed as everything from a plumber to a doctor to a boxing ref to a demolition man throughout his gaming career. “I like to think of [the Mario brothers] as general contractors,” says Kyle Orland of the fansite www.smbhq.com.

(full article)