July 2003


With each new Tekken that comes out, I tell myself I’ve had enough, that I’ve already played these games way too much, but Namco has always pulled me back in with new characters, new mechanics, or even new graphics that make it a fresh experience. This just wasn’t the case with Tekken 4.

(full article) 


I saw the future of video games the other day.

There I was, eating stale pizza and drinking warm soda at a Microsoft promotional event being held at my college, when I saw a nondescript computer science student walking by the rows of dazed Halo players. No one else seemed to take notice of the huge, almost impossible controller in his hands, but I recognized it immediately as the exclusive two-joystick, 27-button, three-pedal interface for Steel Battalion.

(full article)


More than 18,000 visitors have logged into the first four online installments of “Fighting for Rochester’s Future” since the series launched March 30 in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, said managing editor Jane Sutter.

(full article)


More than 2,500 people are expected to weigh in to identify the worst traffic problems in the Everett, WA, area before the local media partners launch Phase II of their “Fix Your Commute” project, which will be an advanced simulation exercise.

Mark Briggs, new media editor of The Everett Herald, described the project’s second phase, set to launch this fall, as “a more advanced interactive experience, allowing users to build roads, add HOV lanes, charge tolls – really make a difference in a simulated way.

“They get a bill and have to come up with funding, too, since we’re trying to base the game in as much reality as possible,”” Briggs said.

(full article) 


I got the feeling that Yanya was trying too hard to be quirky for the sake of quirkiness. From the finger-board controller to the nonsense story and floaty physics, it seems Koei was trying to make a skateboarding game for people who don’t like skateboarding games. If Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater is the American sitcom of skateboarding games, with predictable pacing and familiar set pieces, than Yanya is the genre’s ridiculous Japanese anime, always ready to mess with your expectations of what the genre should be. Much like New York City, it’s a nice place to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there.

(full article)