September 2002


The Terrapin Anime Society is looking to raise awareness of their club among the university population and increase their declining membership after losing many members to graduation last year.

About 20 people were in and out of the club’s first meeting earlier this month, down from crowds of 100 or more that filled Hornbake Library’s fourth-floor viewing gallery in years past.

(full article)


You probably haven’t put much thought into the problem creation process before, have you? You probably just take it for granted that every week there will be new and well-written problems waiting for you in the TopCoder Arena, don’t you? Well, someone has to write those problems before you can code them. Someone has to test the solutions to those problems before you can challenge them. These often-neglected members code feverishly just so that you can have the privilege of competing in TopCoder every week! I went into the administrator’s lobby during one match to de-mystify the process of how a problem gets from the writer’s imagination on to your screen.

(full article)


It’s been said that every video game designer secretly wants to be a movie director. The same could probably be said about most video game players. After all, most games involve players telling on-screen actors what to do and when to do it. Atari’s Stuntman for Playstation 2 takes this concept further than most, letting you be the director of your own movie-style stunt sequences.

(full article)


It’s been six long years since Mario first jumped into the third-dimension with the Nintendo 64 classic Super Mario 64. In that time, lesser mascots like Crash Bandicoot and Sonic the Hedgehog have seen sequel after sequel, while the Mario franchise has been left to simmer with near-miss games like Mario Golf and Luigi’s Mansion.

With the release of Super Mario Sunshine for the GameCube, the wait for a true Mario sequel is over. Was it worth it? Well, it depends on what you’re looking for.

(full article)