March 2002


If real riots were as dull and repetitive as Rockstar\’s State of Emergency for the Playstation 2, perhaps more people would stay at home.

(full article)


Movies based on video games have a less-than-stellar history. When Hollywood tries to mix with Silicon Valley, the result is usually a "zany" action movie that perverts the premise of the game it’s based on (Super Mario Bros., Double Dragon), or a mindless beat-’em-up where the characters stop punching just long enough to deliver some horrible dialogue. (Mortal Kombat: Annihilation, Street Fighter: the Movie). The abysmal critical and financial failure of these early attempts hasn’t stopped moviemakers or audiences, though. Last summer alone saw both the huge-budgetcomputer-animated Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within and the largely undeserved box office success of Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. These movies point to a willingness on the part of both studios and audiences to keep trying this video game movie thing until a good one turns up. We can all stop trying. Resident Evil is that good video game movie we’ve all been waiting for.

(full article)


Like many college students, I was first introduced to concept of the hoverboard through the Back to the Future movie series. I’ll never forget the first time I saw young Marty McFly gliding over the sidewalks of Hill Valley, hanging on the bumper of a hovercar and floating up against the walls of a tunnel on his borrowed Mattel hoverboard. After viewing such amazing feats of acrobatic hovering, my reaction was the same as that of every other pre-adolescent boy at the time:

"Man, I want to do that."

(full article)